A Bitter Buzz: The Psychology Behind Our Love of Coffee

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A new study found that coffee drinkers are actually more sensitive to the bitter taste of caffeine.

Coffee is a complex beverage – and it’s experienced differently by everyone.

Your appreciation (or not) of coffee is largely driven by genetics, which control a host of factors raging from your caffeine tolerance to sensory perception.

A new study from Northwestern University, recently published in Scientific Reports, found that coffee lovers aren’t less sensitive to the bitter taste of coffee – instead, the opposite is true.

This suggests an interesting psychological phenomenon behind our love of coffee.

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How This Coffee Roast May Protect Your Brain

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Both caffeinated and decaf coffee showed the protective effect against cognitive decline

Drinking coffee has previously been linked to a reduced risk of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Now, scientists may be closer to understanding why.

New research from the Krembil Research Institute examines how coffee helps protect against long-term cognitive decline  — and it turns out that the roast might matter.

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The Best Time to Enjoy a Cup of Coffee, According to Science

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Waiting an hour or two could optimize the benefits of caffeine

Behind the Health Headlines: Caffeine


Ghosts, gremlins, the G train in Brooklyn: October is a season for all things grim and ghoulish.

subway-rat

For many of us, few terrors can compare to the theoretical horror of a morning without coffee. 82% of coffee drinkers have coffee at breakfast in the US, according to the NCA National Coffee Drinking Trends report.

Yet in light of the latest research, nutrition and dietary experts are suggesting that having your first cup of caffeine cup a little later in the day offers maximum benefits.

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IBM’s Coffee Delivery Drones Can Predict Your Next Cup

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The drones could read social cues and biometrics to dispatch caffeine when you need it

Because this doesn’t at all sound like the beginning of a post-apocalyptic dystopia where sentient technology withholds caffeine to control the human population, your coffee may one day be delivered by drone — before you even ask.

IBM has secured a patent for a coffee-delivering drone that reads social and biological cues to know when people will need their next caffeine pick-me-ups, reports USA Today.

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Coffee: Still King of the College Dorm

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New market research takes a closer look at the most popular late-night study aid (and early morning eye-opener) on campus.

By Brian Sudano, Managing Partner, Beverage Marketing Corporation

It’s been a scorcher on the East Coast so far this summer. But September is approaching soon – which means cooler weather and back-to-school season.

College students are a growing demographic: U.S. enrollment for  public or private colleges is estimated to reach nearly 20 million in 2018. And their consumption habits offer some interesting insight into the next generation of trends.

In our recent BMC report, “U.S. College Student Beverage Consumption and Attitudes,” we took a deep dive into college student beverage consumption behavior, which we think is a great way to peer into the crystal ball of the future of the industry. We took an especially close look at student attitudes toward coffee, everyone’s favorite early eye-opener and late-night study aid.

Here’s what we found.

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Which Type of Coffee Drinker Are You?

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New research identifies three main groups of caffeine sensitivity among individuals.

Genetic differences help explain why everyone experiences coffee’s effects differently.

via Coffee & Health

Coffee drinkers fall into one of three major groups based on their caffeine sensitivity, according to physician and author Dr J.W. Langer, in a new report authored for the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC).

The report, “Genetics, Metabolism and Individual Responses to Caffeine,” draws on existing research to explain how the body metabolizes caffeine, why some people are more affected by caffeine than others, and how healthcare professionals can take this into account when advising patients.

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Your Coworkers Really Are More Likable After Coffee, Science Confirms

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Coffee can make meetings tolerable more productive – and positive

Coffee Brews Better Group Performance, UC Davis Study Finds

First Research on the Effects of Caffeine on Group Work

The following post was originally published by UC Davis News

By Brad Hooker and Julia Ann Easley 

 

Planning a meeting? Serving coffee can focus group discussion, boost involvement and leave members feeling better about their own and others’ participation.

Those are the findings of new research on the effects of caffeine on group performance from the Graduate School of Management at the University of California, Davis.

Decades of coffee research have explored its effects on the individual, but this study is the first on the effects on performance in group tasks.

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