The Border Adjustment Tax on Coffee: Unintended Consequences?

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By William (Bill) Murray, CEO, NCA
@Bill_CoffeeAssn

The 2016 U.S. presidential election provoked deep passions across the U.S. that continue to be felt today, as the policy implications continue to unfold.

Last December, we took a first look at how coffee-related policies might be impacted by the election, while conceding that there was much yet to be discovered about the new administration.

Among the various initiatives under discussion by the new administration, a “border adjustment tax” potentially has huge implications not only for the coffee sector, but for every coffee drinker in the U.S. – more than 180 million Americans.

Most ironically, in the case of coffee a “border adjustment tax” could raise the price of everyone’s daily coffee, while not having the intended effect of “bringing jobs to America.”

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Leading To The Future: Innovation and Your Coffee Business

By William (Bill) M. Murray, CAE, CEO, National Coffee Association

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Despite the fact that coffee has been part of the human experience for centuries, innovation is now a necessity for companies across all sectors of the coffee industry – more than ever before.  In fact, if you search online for “innovate or die” you’ll easily return more than a half a million results.

What are the factors driving this change? How do we approach and address the challenges? How do we focus strategies and resources to adjust for success? And how can individual executives and business owners come up with new ideas?

First, here’s a snapshot of the issues:

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FSMA Compliance Deadline for Large Companies Has Arrived

By ToxStrategies

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The first major compliance deadline for larger businesses (> 500 employees) to comply with the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Preventive Control rules for human and animal foods has arrived.  FSMA was “a call for a new, prevention-oriented safety system.”  This new focus on prevention requires food facilities to have written food safety plans encompassing both Good Manufacturing Practices and applicable Hazard Analysis and Preventive Controls.

As of September 19, businesses involved in the production of human foods must comply with both the Hazard Analysis and Preventive Controls regulations as well as adhere to the current Good Manufacturing Practices published in 21 CFR Part 117 Subpart B.  Animal food businesses are only required to comply with current Good Manufacturing Practices described in 21 CFR Part 507 Subpart B.

This is a new era for food safety regulation and is being met with some expected angst and trepidation. Continue reading